Elektrosmog und die Auswirkungen auf unsere Gesundheit

Electrosmog and the effects on our health

Opinions are divided on the subject of electrosmog: some of us believe it does not exist. Others feel threatened and live in fear as a result. Understandable, since it is an invisible phenomenon. In fact, however, electrosmog can be physically explained and proven, because electromagnetic waves are real, just like sound waves or light. The only difference is that we cannot consciously perceive them. There is no clear definition for electrosmog itself. Essentially, it arises as a side effect when electrical voltage is present or electrical current flows. We must not forget: As humans, we are a biological organism that is not designed to be exposed to an environment full of technical frequencies. In addition to natural earth radiation, the frequencies of screens, microwaves, power lines, mobile phones, radio, radar, satellites, radio and more add up to a huge unnatural radiation potential. Our bodies are simply overwhelmed by this amount.

But this does not mean that we have to do without all the technical progress that makes our lives easier. It is a matter of consciously addressing how radiation exposure can be reduced in our personal environment and how our bodies cope with electrosmog. Because every person reacts differently to environmental influences. In addition to symptoms such as insomnia, headaches, allergies and ringing in the ears, research shows a connection between burnout and technically generated electromagnetic fields. According to the results, mobile phone and WLAN radiation can lead to cellular stress just as much as constant professional or private overload and emotional tension.


Vibrations and fields

Alternating magnetic and electric fields can upset our biorhythms and thus cause insomnia. This is because they disrupt the nightly production of the hormone melatonin, which is important for growth, reproduction and defence. Calcium metabolism in cells, responsible for cell communication, can also be affected by magnetic fields.

But how do such fields actually arise? To understand this, let's look a little at physics: electric fields are generated by electric charges. Unequal charges attract each other, and equal charges repel each other. The extent of the attraction and repulsion indicates the electric field strength. There are also charges at the two contacts of sockets that oscillate back and forth. The frequency, i.e. the number of oscillations per second, is measured in hertz (Hz). In a 50 Hz socket, the charges oscillate back and forth 50 times per second. This sinusoidal alternating current is the most common form of electrical power supply worldwide. The alternating voltage creates alternating electric fields. These spread out radially around their source. They can therefore be measured on all unshielded power cables, mains-operated and non-grounded devices, as well as on electrically conductive materials in the immediate vicinity of power cables. The metal in spring mattresses, tubular steel furniture or unearthed radiators can absorb and transmit alternating electric fields. Since the attractive forces of the alternating electric fields are also present when no current is flowing, conductive materials should always be located at the greatest possible distance from them. In addition to metals, the human body is also receptive to electric fields due to its high fluid content. This causes the body's own currents to be superimposed and changed. Magnetic fields can also cause electric currents in the body. However, alternating magnetic fields only occur when current flows. Like electric fields and high-frequency waves - these are microwaves, for example - they belong to the category of moving fields.


About electrostatics

In addition to moving fields, there are also fields at rest. These include electric and magnetic DC fields. Direct electric fields, also called electrostatics, are created by electrical voltage differences on the surface of materials. For example, friction can cause plastics to become statically charged. This negative charge then becomes noticeable as hair "flying" after the brush. Negative charges in synthetic materials discharge only slowly or not at all. Natural materials, on the other hand, almost always have positive charges, which are weaker and usually dissipate more quickly.

Even though direct electric fields belong to the resting and thus less critical fields - in order to prevent sleep disturbances and other complaints, we should avoid fields of both types, especially in the sleeping area.


Protection from electrosmog

Reducing exposure is usually simple and inexpensive:

Unnecessary standby: Equipment in standby mode generates electric fields - and increases electricity costs. Better to switch off completely and unplug from the mains.

Flicker boxes: Depending on the type, screens need several hours to days after switching off to reduce existing fields. Therefore, please get TVs and monitors out of the bedroom.

Get rid of the alarm clock: Radio alarm clocks are usually located in the immediate vicinity of the head. The magnetic fields generated can cause migraines, headaches, nervousness, irritability and sleep disturbances. It is best to switch to battery-powered alarm clocks and place them away from the head.

Good night, mobile phone: Mobile phones establish a radio connection 217 times per second. Cordless phones also send signals permanently. For a restful sleep, ban smartphones & Co from the bedroom or switch on flight mode.

Electrostatic and synthetic materials: Wallpaper, curtains, furniture, carpets, clothing and cuddly toys made of synthetic materials cause electrostatic fields. It is better to use natural materials.

Protection against high-frequency radiation from the environment: This is the purpose of certain fabrics, fleeces, foils, wallpapers, plasters and grids. In the case of thermal insulation glazing, the wafer-thin precious metal vapourisation keeps the radiation from outside.


The Körbler signs - protection against electrosmog

Erich Körbler, internationally awarded for the discovery of the New Homeopathy, researched the electromagnetic interaction of biological systems. He found out that people had been using the most modern electronic switching elements since the earliest times: geometric shapes for body painting. Even without knowing anything about electromagnetic waves, cultures far apart from each other independently developed the same shapes. Originally, they were used for strengthening and against pain. But for electromagnetic waves in the nanometre range, they act as antennae. A standing electric wave forms at the centre of the stroke, and polarised fields at the ends of the stroke. Signs of energy, strength and endurance were also found on "Ötzi", the man from the Ötz valley ice, which were also supposed to be warming.

Unbroken bar code: Horizontal bar combinations have a dissolving effect. To curb polluting frequencies, the symbol is placed wherever radiation is generated, for example on electrical appliances such as computers, televisions, refrigerators or electric cookers. A variant of the barcode can be used on high-voltage devices and against GSM mobile phone radiation.

Elias:The vertical sine curve has a similar effect to the barcode. It dissolves stressful frequencies of natural geopathogenic zones (water veins, earth rays etc.) and also helps against electrosmog. For this purpose, the sign is placed at the entry and exit point of the respective energies.

Bar-coded cross: The polarised fields that arise at the ends of the bars can be strengthened or cancelled. Opposing fields block each other. In the cross shape, the flow of energy is not possible. The Mexican Huichol tribe uses bar-like crosses against evil influences.