Die sensible Reizblase

The sensitive irritable bladder

When we have the feeling that we constantly have to go to the toilet - even though our bladder is not yet full - when bladder teas and even antibiotics do not help: Sometimes it is not an inflammation of the bladder, but an unpleasant irritable bladder. However, since the mucous membrane of the bladder is often hypersensitive after an inflammation, an irritable bladder can be the result of a bladder infection.

In principle, a distinction is made between two types of irritable bladder: The primary irritable bladder has no organic cause. Stimuli such as cold, heat and certain drinks trigger the urge to urinate. The secondary irritable bladder is caused by dry mucous membranes, for example when the oestradiol level is low or when taking certain medicines. In both cases, there is an annoying urge to urinate both during the day and at night, which can become a real burden. A diary helps to find out the causes. We write down everything we eat and drink, and when we need to empty our bladder. In this way we find out what puts so much pressure on our bladder.

It is important to avoid everything that over-acidifies our body and irritates our bladder - such as coffee, alcohol, hot spices, meat, sausage, milk, asparagus, spinach and strawberries. A hot alkaline footbath harmonises and warms the body. Warm, moist compresses are also good for the bladder. Subsequent rubbing with eucalyptus oil reduces the feeling of pressure and has a relaxing effect. Mentally, the irritable bladder can be understood as "crying down". Asking ourselves where the psychological pressure comes from and what makes us sad can be a key to healing.


Tip: Bodywork for irritable bladder

Deep breathing and pelvic floor exercises. In stressful situations, breathing exercises such as deep abdominal breathing from Hatha yoga help. To do this, stand upright, take a deep breath slowly and allow the abdomen to bulge outwards. Then tense the abdominal muscle and let the air flow out. Repeat at least ten times. If an irritable bladder is accompanied by incontinence, targeted pelvic floor training helps to regain more control over the sphincter muscle.